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Thread: LPR Diet - List of Soft Foods

  1. #1
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    LPR Diet - List of Soft Foods

    Hi all,

    I'm trying to compile a list of soft foods that are safe to eat for my throat, and I would like to get an idea of what everyone else is eating. So far I've been sticking with chicken noodle soup, mashed potatoes, jello, oatmeal, popsicles, muffins, apple sauce, soft pasta, broth, soft meats like hotdogs or vienna sausages, sardines. NOTHING with tomatoes, lots of spices, or vinegar. NOTHING too hard or crunchy. NO orange juice, or juice that contains high acidity. VERY LITTLE bread. Anything else that I should add to the list of "safe" foods?

    Michelle

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    I'm trying to figure out how 'hotdogs and vienna sausages' fall into the soft food category.
    How about scrambled eggs, cottage cheese, ice cream.

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    You're eating mostly all carbs. You need some food with nutrients - like vegetables. You can take a bunch of fresh veggies and throw them in the blender with some water. Then heat it up and you have a nice soothing soup.

    Stop eating sausage and hot dogs. They are made from crap, including lots of fat and spices that can absolutely be triggers. Eat fish. It's soft. If you find chicken too hard, grind it up in a blender with a little water so it's like baby food. And speaking of that, you might also try baby food in jars if you're finding that you're too sensitive even for regular foods. That includes meats, veggies, and fruit. You can even get it organic (Whole Foods is a great source for that).

    Oh, and honey - especially Manuka honey - great for your throat. And Chamomile Tea and Rooibos Tea are excellent. Plus, buy some powdered slippery elm bark and add some to your tea or just make a tea of it by itself. Excellent for soothing throats.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSAT View Post
    I'm trying to figure out how 'hotdogs and vienna sausages' fall into the soft food category.
    How about scrambled eggs, cottage cheese, ice cream.
    Sigh. That's why I'm here asking, to get a better idea of what to eat. Dairy sets off my LPR.

  5. #5
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    If you can't tolerate dairy, Drink rice milk or almond milk. If you can't find it at your supermarket, go to a health food store. It's not dairy and it's not refrigerated - you'll find it wherever they have the non-refrigerated soy milk. (You refrigerate it after you've opened it.)

    And you can try soy yogurt, if you eat soy (although I don't like the taste at all, myself). There is also a RICE yogurt. It's hard to find other than in health food stores. It's called Ricera. I really like it..kind of tastes more like applesauce than yogurt. But it has all the good probiotics in it.

    You can also get non dairy ice cream: soy, rice, or cashew-milk. Again, you'll fare better in a health food store or Whole Foods.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYer View Post
    You're eating mostly all carbs. You need some food with nutrients - like vegetables. You can take a bunch of fresh veggies and throw them in the blender with some water. Then heat it up and you have a nice soothing soup.

    Stop eating sausage and hot dogs. They are made from crap, including lots of fat and spices that can absolutely be triggers. Eat fish. It's soft. If you find chicken too hard, grind it up in a blender with a little water so it's like baby food. And speaking of that, you might also try baby food in jars if you're finding that you're too sensitive even for regular foods. That includes meats, veggies, and fruit. You can even get it organic (Whole Foods is a great source for that).

    Oh, and honey - especially Manuka honey - great for your throat. And Chamomile Tea and Rooibos Tea are excellent. Plus, buy some powdered slippery elm bark and add some to your tea or just make a tea of it by itself. Excellent for soothing throats.
    Thanks for the great ideas NYer! I'm going shopping today, so I'll just add what you said to the list. There's a Vitamin Shoppe close to where I live, I'll see if they have any Slippery Elm, and Manuka honey.

    Michelle

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYer View Post
    If you can't tolerate dairy, Drink rice milk or almond milk. If you can't find it at your supermarket, go to a health food store. It's not dairy and it's not refrigerated - you'll find it wherever they have the non-refrigerated soy milk. (You refrigerate it after you've opened it.)

    And you can try soy yogurt, if you eat soy (although I don't like the taste at all, myself). There is also a RICE yogurt. It's hard to find other than in health food stores. It's called Ricera. I really like it..kind of tastes more like applesauce than yogurt. But it has all the good probiotics in it.

    You can also get non dairy ice cream: soy, rice, or cashew-milk. Again, you'll fare better in a health food store or Whole Foods.

    Thanks again for the great ideas! I can't do soy or anything nut based, so I'll have to go with the Rice products. No Whole Foods anywhere close, but I'll search around.

  8. #8
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    The Vitamin Shoppe STORES are often kind of limited in inventory and, although they probably would carry slippery elm bark powder, they probably don't have Manuka Honey. Their web site has a LOT more stuff than their stores do.
    You need to go to a natural foods market that has stuff like fresh produce and bins of nuts and things like that. I found ONE store that carries the good Manuka honey and I live in the middle of a city. So I generally mail order it directly from New Zealand. It actually costs the same...just takes a few weeks to get it.

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    Ahh, you're going to have to work harder, like me, then. (I don't eat soy, dairy, or gluten. And although I can eat nuts, I have to keep it in moderation.)
    Rice Dream makes a great rice milk. And you can find it in better grocery stores, too. They make an ice cream but it does contain some soy, so I don't eat that. You're pretty much screwed on the ice cream front if you can't eat dairy, soy, or nuts.

    The Ricera yogurt is hard to find. Whole Foods used to carry it but they didn't have it last time I was there. My natural grocery had it, though. You may fare best for those things by doing online searches and just shopping online for those things. You have to pay shipping, but it's very convenient and you get exactly what you want.

    Make friends with your blender. You can make soup out of all kinds of things and leave out the spices. It's extraordinarily hard to find soup stock that has no onions in it (or pepper or garlic). Just remember to add water to whatever you put in there.

  10. #10
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    I eat the following foods most of which are soft: papaya, bananas, melon, blueberries, ripe pears, stewed apples, figs, kiwi fruit, steamed broccoli, sweet potato, peas, carrots, beet-root, spinach, egg white omelette (my husband has the yolks as they are acid) chicken soup, turkey soup, oats, plain and vanilla soya yogurt, goats milk yogurt, ginger tea, rooibos tea, manuka honey, mango juice, apple juice.

    I hope your throat gets better soon.

    Pam

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    Pamalambs,
    I don't know why you think that egg yolks are acidic. They're not - and whole eggs are very digestible for people with GERD, too. On the other hand, you eat kiwi fruit...which is acidic and that's something that many people have to stay away from (similar to pineapple). It's so interesting how we all have different triggers.
    Also, I don't know why, but a lot of people here have problems with bananas.

    I have a problem with chicken soup, unfortunately, because the stock always has onions and pepper in it. But that may be more of a problem for GERD than LPR, I don't know.

  12. #12
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    Hi NYer,

    Thank you for your comments.

    I have seen eggs listed as acid on lists on the internet and also as neutral. So as you say what is good for one may not be good for another.

    I make my own chicken soup and add other vegetables whatever I have to hand. I can eat raw peppers, but not onions cooked or raw and can eat, blueberries, kiwi fruit and bananas (but not too ripe). I find cinnamon, turmeric and fresh herbs good for flavoring in different meals and soups.

    I am also taking calcium citrate, magnesium and vit d (as recommended by yourself), vitamin B complex and fish oils.

    I am better on this diet, but still get symptoms, but not as bad as if I were to eat fish, meat, cheese, pasta, cakes or sweets or drink coffee, tea wine etc.

    I just hope there may be some healing of my throat if I stay away from foods that make it worse. In July my throat was really bad, but it has improved in the last couple of weeks. It is still irritated and I still cough and produce plenty of mucus and the breathlessness is not as bad as it was.

    Pam

  13. #13
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    Thanks Pam,

    I hope your throat gets better too!

    With eggs, it all depends on how they are cooked. As long as they are soft scrambled, I don't have a problem with them. Poached, Boiled, or Fried - they give me indigestion. I can eat bananas if they are ripe enough, otherwise I get lots of indigestion with those as well. I have no problem with well cooked onions, it's the raw onions that give me grief.

    Has anyone tried Pomegranate juice?? If so, how did it work for you? It's a bit too acidic for my throat right now, but I've read that it has healing properties.

    Michelle

  14. #14
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    I tried pomegranate juice and, although it didn't hurt, it didn't do anything at all to help. But I know that Mark-from-Seattle swears by it - or he did, I don't know if he still does. He's got a thread on here if you search for pomegranate juice and it says exactly what type to get, etc. But again, I gave it a fair chance and found it non-helpful for me.

    Eggs and meat often show up on those sites that purport to define foods as creating acid or creating alkalinity in you system. But even on the sites that are legitimate that espouse that view, they're not actually saying that eggs or meat CONTAIN acid. And for our purposes here, we're looking to avoid foods that CONTAIN acid and 'hot" spices. I agree that the way that eggs are COOKED is a factor, though. Scrambled eggs never bother me, I find them really easy to eat, in fact, but I cook them in only a little bit of olive oil. If you use butter, you'll probably have a problem. High fats are a no-no. Hard boiled is also fine for me.

    But I can see where fried eggs (fat) or soft boiled or over easy might be a problem from the yolks not being cooked enough and, therefore, possibly not very digestible. That's not due to being an acidic food, though.

    Wow, Pam, you can't eat any fish or meat no matter what form? I don't eat red meat, but I eat fish a lot - only broiled, baked, or canned with nothing on it and cooked with no sauce of any kind. (and no oil). I can also eat chicken if it's cooked the same way - no spices on it and no skin.

    By the way, by "spices", as Pam said, lots of them are fine (oregano, thyme, rosemary, sage, etc.) but no "hot" spices like peppers, garlic, onion, hot sauce. Although ginger is supposed to be helpful, I find it to be a problem. And tumeric, which Pam mentioned, actually has anti-inflammatory properties, so if it doesn't bother your system, it may actually help it!

    Curcumin is the primary ingredient in tumeric and you can get it as a supplement in a capsule. It's what makes curry yellow. It's been proven to work as an anti-inflammatory. I found that it did help my back pain to some degree. But I also think it may have irritated my stomach. I would give it another try to confirm that, though. I'm very sensitive - other people may find it fine. and considering that none of us can take NSAIDs (like Motrin, etc.), it's worth a try.

    Anyway, that's my two cents for now. Eat well!
    -NYer

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