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  • doctormom
    started a topic Lpr

    Lpr

    Please help....I have been diagnosed with LPR after a year and 20 doctors. I have never seen my symptoms anywhere. In addition to hoarseness, I have fluid in what seems like the E-tubes. It crackles and at the same time I have nasal congestion. When all this is happening, my ears are hissing. When there is no fluid and no congestion, my ears are not hissing. Has anyone had acid back into the nasal passage and E-tubes. I am going crazy. I cannot take the PPI's because I have adverse reactions to them. I think I want surgery. Thank you for your help. Sandy

  • af
    replied
    [i]Originally posted by macmember [/i]
    [B]Just FYI...I do take Zoloft and Calcium Channel Blockers already. Things could be a lot worse. It just bothers me when I don't know if the pain is my heart or not. It's a shame that I broke my fortune telling ball.
    Thanks
    Thanks [/B]
    Well, there are some things that we have to lay in the hands of God, maybe this is one of them. Sometimes we try to bear the burden ourselves, when in actuality we need to be turning them over to Him. If you believe in God, may this be the way that you find relief, since the earthly doctors don't seem to have a decent cure or treatment.

    A preacher once told me that our biggest problem is that we have faith, but we don't use it. We end up bearing the load ourselves instead of dumping it at the feet of Jesus. May you find peace and help in using your faith, whatever faith that may be.

    (Pardon my digression into non-medical things, but sometimes this is the better answer for us.)
    Good luck and may you find peace and relief.

    Leave a comment:


  • macmember
    replied
    [i]Originally posted by af [/i]
    [B]Oxygen should not relieve stomach/esophagus pain. That's a vote for heart.

    Bummer that you have a LBBB, that really screws everything on the EKG.

    You have what is called "variant angina" or in older time "prinzmetal's angina". This is a hard nut to crack, as you know by now. Nitrates are THE most effective medication for controlling this kind of pain. Calcium blockers are also very noted for decreasing spasm problems on a preventative basis (but unfortunately not good for GERD, from what I read).

    Are you on any anti-anxiety agent or anti-depressant? One of these might help both heart and stomach...just a thought...

    If it was me, I would probably treat any pain as though it were my heart FIRST, and if that did not work, then would treat my stomach/esophagus. Since heart medicine (nitrates) can help esophagus spasms, heart treatment might help digestive tract pain anyway.

    I understand your frustration. Just having vasospastic angina in and of itself is a horrible frustration!! In 20 years of cardiac nursing we never found a totally suitable treatment for this. Some of us have it, most of us don't. It's hard to know why some are selected as the unfortunate few who suffer with this problem. [/B]
    Just FYI...I do take Zoloft and Calcium Channel Blockers already. Things could be a lot worse. It just bothers me when I don't know if the pain is my heart or not. It's a shame that I broke my fortune telling ball.
    Thanks
    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • af
    replied
    [i]Originally posted by macmember [/i]
    [B]1) I have a Left Bundle Branch Blockage and nothing shows up on the EKG, so that wouldn't work.

    2) Physical Activity does not bring on my severe angina spells. Emotions (mental stress) or just NOTHING brings it on. I have been confirmed as having coronery artery spasms by the Interventionist. Physical activity wears me down and then I have chest pressure but not normally severe angina.

    3) The pain does radiate to my collarbone, neck and jaw a lot of the time.

    4) Sometime Nitro works right away and sometime it takes up to 6-7 during a 15-20 minutes period.

    5) Would you say that if oxygen slows it down or relieves it in 15-20 minutes that it is the heart?

    I do appreciate your input, even if you are not a Doctor, you are experienced. [/B]
    Oxygen should not relieve stomach/esophagus pain. That's a vote for heart.

    Bummer that you have a LBBB, that really screws everything on the EKG.

    You have what is called "variant angina" or in older time "prinzmetal's angina". This is a hard nut to crack, as you know by now. Nitrates are THE most effective medication for controlling this kind of pain. Calcium blockers are also very noted for decreasing spasm problems on a preventative basis (but unfortunately not good for GERD, from what I read).

    Are you on any anti-anxiety agent or anti-depressant? One of these might help both heart and stomach...just a thought...

    If it was me, I would probably treat any pain as though it were my heart FIRST, and if that did not work, then would treat my stomach/esophagus. Since heart medicine (nitrates) can help esophagus spasms, heart treatment might help digestive tract pain anyway.

    I understand your frustration. Just having vasospastic angina in and of itself is a horrible frustration!! In 20 years of cardiac nursing we never found a totally suitable treatment for this. Some of us have it, most of us don't. It's hard to know why some are selected as the unfortunate few who suffer with this problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • macmember
    replied
    [i]Originally posted by af [/i]
    [B]There are no hard and fast ways to discriminate between stomach and heart pain (I'm an old cardiac nurse, FWIW), however here are some things to consider:

    1. A 24-hour Holter monitor is the first test I would consider: reason being, you can make a diary and note when your pain is worse, and the doc can check your EKG and see if there is any sign of EKG ischemia during the painful episodes. It's not a sure thing, but it could be helpful if anything positive showed up on the EKg when you had pain.
    2. IF you can bring on the same pain with physical activity, then that is a plus for it's being cardiac. For instance, if you can walk and have the same pain, then that's more likely to be your heart.
    3. Heart pain often radiates to other places, such as the neck, jaw, or most commonly the left arm. Stomach pain MIGHT do this, but generally not as predictably.
    4. Try a nitro and see if it gives relief. It MIGHT still give relief for stomach problems, however if you get QUICK relief (I mean within one-two mins), then this is more likely the heart. When nitro relieves stomach pains, it's usually relieving esophageal spasms, and the relief tends to occur more slowly.

    Again, these are just my thoughts, and there are no hard and fast rules in this game. It can be a challenge, even for a cardiologist! [/B]
    1) I have a Left Bundle Branch Blockage and nothing shows up on the EKG, so that wouldn't work.

    2) Physical Activity does not bring on my severe angina spells. Emotions (mental stress) or just NOTHING brings it on. I have been confirmed as having coronery artery spasms by the Interventionist. Physical activity wears me down and then I have chest pressure but not normally severe angina.

    3) The pain does radiate to my collarbone, neck and jaw a lot of the time.

    4) Sometime Nitro works right away and sometime it takes up to 6-7 during a 15-20 minutes period.

    5) Would you say that if oxygen slows it down or relieves it in 15-20 minutes that it is the heart?

    I do appreciate your input, even if you are not a Doctor, you are experienced.

    Leave a comment:


  • af
    replied
    [i]Originally posted by macmember [/i]
    [B]I tried Prilosec and it did not help. I went to prescription strength Zantac and can tell a difference in the amount of pressure I can feel in my chest. My problem is that I do have serious heart disease and do not know the difference in angina and this LPR ( if that is what I have)! I AM SOOOOOO CONFUSED.. Before I tried the Zantac I was taking a lot more Nito. If anyone can tell me how to tell the difference I would appreciate it. [/B]
    There are no hard and fast ways to discriminate between stomach and heart pain (I'm an old cardiac nurse, FWIW), however here are some things to consider:

    1. A 24-hour Holter monitor is the first test I would consider: reason being, you can make a diary and note when your pain is worse, and the doc can check your EKG and see if there is any sign of EKG ischemia during the painful episodes. It's not a sure thing, but it could be helpful if anything positive showed up on the EKg when you had pain.
    2. IF you can bring on the same pain with physical activity, then that is a plus for it's being cardiac. For instance, if you can walk and have the same pain, then that's more likely to be your heart.
    3. Heart pain often radiates to other places, such as the neck, jaw, or most commonly the left arm. Stomach pain MIGHT do this, but generally not as predictably.
    4. Try a nitro and see if it gives relief. It MIGHT still give relief for stomach problems, however if you get QUICK relief (I mean within one-two mins), then this is more likely the heart. When nitro relieves stomach pains, it's usually relieving esophageal spasms, and the relief tends to occur more slowly.

    Again, these are just my thoughts, and there are no hard and fast rules in this game. It can be a challenge, even for a cardiologist!

    Leave a comment:


  • macmember
    replied
    [i]Originally posted by Hawk [/i]
    [B]When you are laying down you are not getting the assistance of gravity to keep the content of the stomach in place. So, raising the head of the bed or using a special pillow would not hurt anything and may help.

    I know in my case, using Prilosec resolves most of my symptoms (and watching what I eat a drink) but if I sleep flat I can tell the difference.

    Maybe some with LPR will include their comments. [/B]
    I tried Prilosec and it did not help. I went to prescription strength Zantac and can tell a difference in the amount of pressure I can feel in my chest. My problem is that I do have serious heart disease and do not know the difference in angina and this LPR ( if that is what I have)! I AM SOOOOOO CONFUSED.. Before I tried the Zantac I was taking a lot more Nito. If anyone can tell me how to tell the difference I would appreciate it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hawk
    replied
    [i]Originally posted by doctormom [/i]
    [B]Hawk,
    Thank you for the information on the pillow. However, if you have LPR and it can happen 24 hours per day while standing, does it matter if you have your bed tilted while sleeping? I have been curious about this for awhile. Thank you for your help. [/B]
    When you are laying down you are not getting the assistance of gravity to keep the content of the stomach in place. So, raising the head of the bed or using a special pillow would not hurt anything and may help.

    I know in my case, using Prilosec resolves most of my symptoms (and watching what I eat a drink) but if I sleep flat I can tell the difference.

    Maybe some with LPR will include their comments.

    Leave a comment:


  • doctormom
    replied
    Hawk,
    Thank you for the information on the pillow. However, if you have LPR and it can happen 24 hours per day while standing, does it matter if you have your bed tilted while sleeping? I have been curious about this for awhile. Thank you for your help.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hawk
    replied
    Also check out [url]www.propuppillow.com[/url]

    They seem to address how the wedge fits to the back quite well.

    Leave a comment:


  • doctormom
    replied
    Rebecca,
    Thank you for the good tip. I have a Relax a Back store in my area and I will go in and see how comfortable it will be for me. I am only 5ft and some things don't hit me in the right area. Perhaps this will do the trick.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rebecca
    replied
    Hi doctormom,

    For what it's worth... I could never seem to master sleeping with blocks under my bed. I would wake up on the other side of the bed, or hanging off the bed, etc. Then I bought a bedwedge at the Relax the Back store and it has done wonders. It was expensive ($175), but was well worth it. Here's the link [url]http://www.relaxtheback.com/global/product/pg_product_detail.cfm?TID=561930134656600323024867 &CFID=82301346&CFTOKEN=640323028&Site=main&Group_I D=1739[/url]

    --Rebecca

    Leave a comment:


  • doctormom
    replied
    Thank you for your replies. I bought 2" wood blocks so I will try 4" and see how that works. The thought of slipping out of bed is not very desirable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick
    replied
    slip sliding away

    Yeah, flannel sheets seemed to work well for me, to keep from sliding off the bottom of the bed. Plus, I kept the sheets tucked in at the bottom.

    Also, you may not need to go quite that high. I used 4" concrete landscaping blocks and those seemed to work really well.

    Leave a comment:


  • af
    replied
    [i]Originally posted by doctormom [/i]
    [B]For anyone who has raised their bed about 6 inches off the floor, did you slip down on the bed? I am going to try raising my bed up on blocks but I feel like I will slip down. Does anyone have any suggestions? Thank you [/B]
    1. I keep a couple of pillows at the foot of the bed under the covers/sheets, and that pretty much takes care of any slippage.

    2. Don't use satin sheets!

    Leave a comment:

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